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Bringing Tactile Pressure Sensing Technology to Touchpads

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Jae Son
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Blogger
Re: Clarification
Jae Son   2/1/2014 12:18:53 AM
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Capacitive touch sensors don't detect mechanical force. That is why you can activate it even before touching the screen (especially on an android phone), but there has been a lot of buzz from HP and patents from Apple on enabling that third dimension (how hard did you press) and this new technology is using what we call tactile pressure sensing.

Jae Son
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Blogger
Re: Clarification
Jae Son   2/1/2014 12:18:51 AM
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Capacitive touch sensors don't detect mechanical force. That is why you can activate it even before touching the screen (especially on an android phone), but there has been a lot of buzz from HP and patents from Apple on enabling that third dimension (how hard did you press) and this new technology is using what we call tactile pressure sensing.

AnandY
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Gold
Re: Clarification
AnandY   1/23/2014 6:13:01 AM
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From this piece, I am made to understand that the touch gestures on the screen are registered by the screen through some mechanical actions. But on my Smartphone, I don't even have to really touch the screen physically (though I have to bring my fingers very close to it) in order to submit inputs. Could you please clarify how that works?

AnandY
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Gold
Re: Informative
AnandY   1/23/2014 6:09:07 AM
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I have always wondered how the computer manufacturers increase the sensitivities of the touch screens that they make and until I read this piece I never thought there was anything mechanical in the operation. From this piece it seems to me that the sensitivities of the screen could be increased to even accommodate complete hand gestures for conventional tablets.

Jae Son
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Blogger
Re: Good user interface
Jae Son   1/20/2014 12:30:14 PM
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Check out this video from CES 

http://blog.laptopmag.com/synaptics-forcepad-feels-the-force-so-you-can-swipe-less-video

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Good user interface
tekochip   1/20/2014 8:36:00 AM
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Now there's a practicle application for the product that would provide for an excellent user interface.  This would be a great way to slew scroll buttons.

Jae Son
User Rank
Blogger
Re: New Technology
Jae Son   1/19/2014 5:18:44 PM
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Hi Greg,

Yes, because our capacitive tactile and force sensing technology detects actual mechanical forces, there is no need for a special conductive glove that makes capacitive touch sensors function properly.  You can wear a glove, press it with a wooden stick and it also has the benefits of reduced accidental activation and working in wet environments.  More to follow very shortly.

Greg M. Jung
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Platinum
Re: New Technology
Greg M. Jung   1/17/2014 9:55:36 PM
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Thanks for the informationl.  Can this technology sense movement on the fingertips when a regular glove is worn?  (Or would a special type of conductive glove need to be used?)

Jae Son
User Rank
Blogger
Re: New Technology
Jae Son   1/17/2014 1:22:38 AM
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Good question.  While this would be an issue with a resistive tactile sensor technology because the two layers of electrodes contact and rub against one another, this isn't a problem for capacitive sensors because the two electrodes never touch.  Life testing of 5 million cycles has been tested without problems.

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
New Technology
Greg M. Jung   1/16/2014 9:04:17 PM
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Good idea for new computer interface applications.  How does the actuation life compare with traditional switch technology (does performance or sensitivity degrade over time, temperature or number of actuations?)

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