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5 Things That Can Benefit From Capacitive Tactile Pressure Sensors

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Rob Spiegel
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Re: Musical Instruments
Rob Spiegel   12/5/2013 10:58:48 AM
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Great point, Tekochip. Electronic instruments are very linear. Wouldn't it be wonderful to add infinite variation?

William K.
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Re: Steering wheel music
William K.   12/4/2013 11:29:24 PM
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Naperlou, you are exactly correct. And the very worst choice would be some of that really awful "beautiful music" from the Andre castelanitz group. And we all know that the choice of music would be made by some real nut-job neurotic fool in the national traffic safety department. 

Besides all of that, when I grip the wheel tightly is usually when I am avoiding a collision of some sort, at which time I need every bit of attention and concentration focused on staying out of harms way. The way to reduce road-rage incidents is to make cars smaller, thinner, and less collision-damage resistant. Knowing that you don't have any armor on is a good way to tone down a desire to fight.

William K.
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Re: Steering wheel music
William K.   12/4/2013 11:21:19 PM
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The very first time that my car started playing some of that music designed to reduce stress would be the very last time it started playing that music. That sort of thing could easily put a company out of business, which would be appropriate for any company incorperating such an incredibly stupid idea in their products. How about using wheel touch sensors to start an external flasher to tell the police that the driver has no hands on the wheel? Or even just a reminder sound to keep hands on the wheel.

Now capacitive sensors as product development instrumentation sound like a useful tool.

tekochip
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Musical Instruments
tekochip   12/2/2013 10:29:41 PM
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Setting aside driving and concentrating on music, I think a musical instrument is the ideal application.  Stringed instruments benefit from an interface that is very expressive from the left hand and the right.  Electronic instruments and keyboards have always lacked that capability.  A number of attempts have been made to add that level of expression and perhaps a cap pressure sensor would be the right sensor.


Rob Spiegel
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Re: Steering wheel music
Rob Spiegel   12/2/2013 7:02:17 PM
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As in who's in the passenger seat, Tekochip? This is a good list of items that would benefit from capacitive tactile pressure sensors. I'm sure plenty of others will show up.

tekochip
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Re: Steering wheel music
tekochip   12/2/2013 12:23:45 PM
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Typically, if I have stress while I'm driving it has more to do with the passenger seat than any music.


naperlou
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Re: Steering wheel music
naperlou   12/2/2013 11:53:51 AM
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TJ, perhaps it could be used to inject a sedative.  That would work. 

Of course, with music, it depends on what type of music you play.  Will the user be able to choose.  Any particular music may be soothing to one person and aggrivating to anther.  I assume this would be a user setting.

TJ McDermott
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Steering wheel music
TJ McDermott   12/2/2013 9:52:22 AM
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Technology's role in the world is to improve our quality of life, but I think this particular use of pressure sensors is a non-starter.

The suggested reason for having it play music would only increase road rage.  Maybe its intent is to redirect the rage from outside to inside the car?

In any case, this is one technology I do not want in my vehicle.  Heck, I've said it repeatedly, I don't want to touch the wheel at all - autonomous vehicle is in my future.

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