HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
REGISTER   |   LOGIN   |   HELP
Blogs
Guest Blogs

Monitoring Load-Pin Stresses Cuts Crane Maintenance Costs

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Threaded|Newest First|Oldest First
Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
The smart crane
Rob Spiegel   5/8/2013 10:56:18 AM
NO RATINGS
This is a good way of managing the ownership or rental of a crane. This type of analysis has been used on plant equipment for nearly a decade now. In many cases, the data readings go to the machine vendor who maintains the machine's uptime for the manufacturer. Smart equipment makes efficient equipment.

warren@fourward.com
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The smart crane
warren@fourward.com   5/8/2013 1:53:48 PM
You have to wonder how many industries could still use this technology.  Imagine the expesive parts replaced through PM that really had never been stressed.  I am thinking airplanes?  bull dozers, politicians?

GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Re: The smart crane
GTOlover   5/9/2013 9:08:40 AM
NO RATINGS
Good point warren. I think a lot of equipment gets maintenanced when it breaks! Obviously an airplane or crane is not something you want to break, so you replace parts wether they need them or not.

However, for the politician you only need one sensor. If they speak of solving a problem, you know they are lying and need replacing!

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The smart crane
Rob Spiegel   5/9/2013 9:58:21 AM
NO RATINGS
Good point, Warren. Prlobably billions have been wasted by replacing parts that were still in good shape. There is a fair chance our car oil would be effectiuve for thousands of miles more than we let it.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The smart crane
TJ McDermott   5/9/2013 10:24:55 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob, I think there should be rebuttal to your statement about wasted money replacing parts still in good working order.

Alaska airlines flight 261 crashed into the Pacific Ocean because a jackscrew was put back into service after passing maintenance checks that were inadequate.  It suffered excessive wear because of inadequate lubrication (maintenance at fault there).

The information I had at the time said it was still .001" in tolerance.

The part was still in "good shape" (it was still within tolerance).  Expected wear was .001" per 1000 flight hours, while Alaska was actually getting 12 times as much (.012" per 1000 hours).

There were a number of chances to avert the accident; one of them was to accept the cost of replacing a "good" part that was so close to being bad.

Replacing parts that are still good keeps the margin of safety of a machine well away from 1.0.

Partner Zone
More Blogs from Guest Blogs
As an industry, we now need to up our game and provide contractors with easier ways to properly identify and report counterfeit products and build collaboration between manufacturers, design engineers, industry organizations, and government.
It’s your job to find the right people, ask the right questions, to dig deeper, and properly prepare your users so they can provide you the most useful and productive answers possible.
The shift to aluminum is gaining momentum and the demand from automakers for aluminum is soaring, "expecting to reach one billion pounds this year, up from 200 million in 2012, and to grow by more than 30% annually through 2020."
Einstein in a Box inspires critical thinking with the actual doing and experiencing. They take the statement "inquiring minds want to know" to a whole new level.
Negligence results when an engineer has failed to comply in ways in which a responsible engineer would in a similar situation. Avoiding negligence means that an engineer should not fail in his or her assigned duties.
Design News Webinar Series
3/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
2/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
12/18/2013 Available On Demand
11/20/2013 Available On Demand
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 21 - 25, Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: April 29 - Day 1
Sponsored by maxon precision motors
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service