HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Guest Blogs

MPPE Insulation & the Incredible, Shrinking Medical Device

NO RATINGS
1 saves
Page 1 / 2 Next >
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
apresher
User Rank
Blogger
MPPE Insulation
apresher   3/27/2013 2:08:22 PM
NO RATINGS
Excellent article.  It's interesting how "building block" products play a role in continuing to make medical devices smaller and lighter.  The environmental aspects of MPPE is a good bonus and increasingly becoming a decision point for consumers.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: MPPE Insulation
Charles Murray   3/27/2013 5:05:39 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm curious if MPPE is mostly limited to medical devices. If so, why?

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Re: MPPE Insulation
Tim   3/27/2013 9:30:12 PM
NO RATINGS
The article stated that the MPPE insulation is recyclable.  With the use as a medical device, would the recyclability of the item be considered as a selling point for the device?  Wouldn't medical devices be considered bio-hazzard after use?

TimHowlett_AlphaWire
User Rank
Iron
Re: MPPE Insulation
TimHowlett_AlphaWire   3/28/2013 9:30:59 AM
NO RATINGS
Hi Tim- We cannot speak for the entire medical device, only our wire & cable.  Frankly, I don't know what the procedures are for disposal of Medical Devices.  I do know that Electronic Equipment typically falls under the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Directive, and all of our EcoGen products (EcoWire, EcoWire Plus, EcoCable, and EcoFlex) are WEEE compliant.

TimHowlett_AlphaWire
User Rank
Iron
Re: MPPE Insulation
TimHowlett_AlphaWire   3/28/2013 9:36:54 AM
NO RATINGS
Charles- It is definitely not limited to medical devices.  That was merely the focus of this article, since we are trying to gain market share in the medical industry.

To be honest, we expect to sell a lot more to Industrial Machine builders, particularly with the EcoFlex product.  EcoFlex has finer stranding and is very supple and flexible (hence its name).  We are marketing it as a smaller/better/eco-friendlier version of the OLFLEX 190.

Marvin McConoughey
User Rank
Iron
Re: MPPE Insulation
Marvin McConoughey   3/28/2013 10:06:02 AM
NO RATINGS
The improved wire insulation would also be useful for residential and commercial building wiring by allowing easier pull-through, more conductors in a given sized electrical box, etc.  Do all you can to bring the costs down.

apresher
User Rank
Blogger
MPPE Insulation
apresher   3/28/2013 10:52:31 AM
NO RATINGS
From machine builders, I would think that finer stranding and flexibility would be major advantages beyond the eco-friendly aspects of the product.

D. Sherman
User Rank
Gold
Re: MPPE Insulation
D. Sherman   3/28/2013 11:20:37 AM
NO RATINGS
Most residential and commercial wiring is #14-#10 gauge, where all the wiring devices are set up to use solid wire. Connecting solid to stranded with a wire nut (as in ceiling fixtures) can be problematic, and the finer the strands the likelier it is that the strands simply wrap around the solid wire and the nut around the fine strands, with nothing to bite into the solid wire and keep the nut and stranded wire from slipping off. Switches, outlets, and other devices that use a simple screw with the wire looped around them, are very difficult, and probably illegal, to use with stranded wire, so a whole new set of wiring devices would need to be developed. Furthermore when using conduit of reasonably short lenghts, it's common to push the wire through directly, without using a fish tape or other pulling device. This is reasonably easy with solid THHN wire, with it's stiffness and slick overcoat, but would be next to impossible with stranded wire, especially wire that is especially flexible.

Note also that the codes specify the maximum number of wires allowed in a conduit based on the AWG of the wire and the current, because the limitation is one of heating rather than physical packing density, so if a conduit was currently packed to the maximum allowed using THHN, the thinner insulation of this new wire would not allow an electrician to put even more wires in that conduit.

I don't see any kind of flexible wire replacing TNNH or NM cable. Where it would be very useful is in control cabinets of industrial equipment where space is at a premium and tight bends are required. Most newer industrial control devices come with terminals that will work easily with stranded wire. That's a lot smaller niche than building wiring, but also a more valuable one if it saves installation time.

TimHowlett_AlphaWire
User Rank
Iron
Re: MPPE Insulation
TimHowlett_AlphaWire   3/28/2013 3:53:56 PM
NO RATINGS
@apresher- You're somewhat correct.  Most machine builders could care less about the environmentally-friendly attributes.  However, the finer stranding and flexibility aren't exclusive to the EcoFlex product; these are common in PVC product as well.  The size & weight savings are far & away the biggest differentiator for MPPE products to machine builders (and most customers).  Now, I said you're somewhat correct because the smaller OD does make it more flexible than PVC (as flexibility is measured as a multiple of OD, and this has a smaller OD).

I should also add that in certain industries, such as Semiconductor Fabrication Equipment, the low outgassing is extremely valuable, as it doesn't emit a toxic gas that can damage the wafer.  Semi equip't manufacturers have been designing around this for years (since they primarily use PVC cable).

Marvin McConoughey
User Rank
Iron
Re: MPPE Insulation
Marvin McConoughey   3/30/2013 1:00:28 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks. On reflection, I agree with your logic and analysis.

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Guest Blogs
More often than not, with the purchase of a sports car comes the sacrifice of any sort of utility. In other words, you can forget about a large trunk, extra seats for the kids, and more importantly driving in snowy (or inclement) weather. But what if there was a vehicle that offered the best of both worlds; great handling and practicality?
As additive manufacturing (including 3D printing) becomes increasingly popular among businesses as a quick and easy solution to creating and evaluating prototypes and end-use products, the debate about whether to outsource production or to purchase equipment for in-house use is at the forefront of industry discussions.
With increasing terrorist threats overseas, organizations are thinking about how best to defend themselves here and abroad. Engineering can play a role, especially when it comes to putting a barrier between yourself and the bad guys.
Time to market is everything, but at the same time, you can’t sacrifice quality for speed. That’s where additive manufacturing comes into play.
In the last few years, use of CFD in building design has increased manifolds. Computational fluid dynamics is effective in analyzing the flow and thermal properties of air within spaces. It can be used in buildings to find the best measures for comfortable temperature at low energy use.
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Nov 3 - 7, Engineering Principles behind Advanced User Interface Technologies
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service