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Embedding Power Everywhere

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richnass
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What's different this time?
richnass   11/14/2012 9:21:46 AM
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I hate to be a downer, but we've heard the promises of solar more times than I can count. Why should this time be different?

Nancy Golden
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Re: What's different this time?
Nancy Golden   11/14/2012 10:01:45 AM
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I see what you are saying Rich, but I think they may be on to something - versatility may be key to being able to utilize the technology. Portable units that are more flexible make good sense. It also involves a paradigm shift - people have to get on board. I think renewable energy is only going to become increasingly important, despite its slow start.

Rich Kapusta
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Re: What's different this time?
Rich Kapusta   11/14/2012 11:46:12 AM
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Rich - you are right to be skeptical.  The industry is going through an interesting time right now, but our technology is certainly different.  What we've developed here at Alta, is a solar cell that is thin and flexible, AND ultra-efficient, AND easily manufacturable.  This allows us to embed energy generation into things where power, size, and weight matter, while providing a significantly more meaningful amount of power than previously possible.  Our target markets are systems that are primarily battery powered and un-connected to the grid in order to extend the usefulness of those systems.  

Charles Murray
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Re: What's different this time?
Charles Murray   11/14/2012 6:35:44 PM
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Rich. Reading your article, it appears you're focused mostly on non-grid applications. Is the likelihood of success in those applications any greater than the likelihood of solar-based grid systems?

Rich Kapusta
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Re: What's different this time?
Rich Kapusta   11/14/2012 7:07:29 PM
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Charles - that is a great observation, and exactly what we are focused on.  Off-grid energy is all about mobility which values size and weight.  Many thin film technologies have tried to succeed here, but their low-efficiencies (barely 10%) have prevented them from succeeding.  Our ultra-thin technology at 29% efficiency provides significantly more power per kg and per square meter, which changes the game dramatically.

Mydesign
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Solar energy
Mydesign   11/15/2012 3:48:44 AM
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"Solar technology can be integrated into the wings of unmanned aerial vehicles for both military and civilian uses,"

Rich, solar energy is using even in Satellites. I read that there are plans for using solar energy in space vehicles too, for powering the communication and other related devices in equipment bay.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Solar energy
Cabe Atwell   11/15/2012 5:02:53 PM
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Solar will only take when the time it takes to recover the panel's cost is shorter than 3 years. Right now, most alternative energy options take quite some time to recover initial investment, even with subsidies. Not to get into specifics, but some solar panels in prototype phases are returning over the industries best of a 15% light-energy ratio. When a panel approaches 40% return, then maybe it will take over.

As for energy from everywhere, vibration, sound, heat, etc may play a part in mobile power supplies. We can only hope.

 

C

Mydesign
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Re: Solar energy
Mydesign   11/23/2012 1:37:00 AM
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Atwell, as of now for household purpose, the ROI from any solar based investment is 7-10 years (from my experience). I had done a comparative study and found that eventhough we are using low quality/cost panels and devices, then also it will take 5-8 years for enough ROI. But if the power tariffs are increasing, then we may able to get a good ROI below 5 year.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Solar energy
Ann R. Thryft   11/16/2012 11:43:29 AM
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Thin and flexible solar cells may be one of the solar energy waves of the future. We've reported on a few of these in DN. Here's one: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=248975 and we'll be publishing a post on another one soon. Mydesign is correct, solar panels are used on spacecraft and satellites.

Rich Kapusta
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Re: Solar energy
Rich Kapusta   11/19/2012 7:11:19 PM
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Thanks for all the great comments.  Solar has most definitely been used in the space industry for years.  What Alta Devices is providing, is a similar (and in some cases higher) level of energy conversion efficiency, at price points and scale targeted at "mobile" terrestrial applications.  The ability to embed power into every day materials is what sets us apart from the rest of the industry.  We are certainly in an exciting phase in the industry.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Solar energy
Ann R. Thryft   11/20/2012 4:26:19 PM
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The hybrid solar/generator combination the author describes here is what Tokelau is using. That's the 3-island nation that just went 100% sustainable for its electrical need, which we wrote about here
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=254016
I think marrying flex circuit technology with solar cells is a great idea.

Mydesign
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Re: Solar energy
Mydesign   11/23/2012 1:41:57 AM
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Ann, in our country there are some hybrid solar generators are available. Hybrid means a combination of both wind and solar. During day time solar energy is using for power generation and during night and dark time, wind mill will work to generate power. But in both cases, availability of sunlight and wind throughout year may be a concern.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Solar energy
Ann R. Thryft   11/26/2012 12:12:13 PM
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Mydesign, thanks for that input, I wasn't aware of those hybrid generators. At least in concept, they sound like a good idea. In the Tokelau solution, "hvbrid" refers to a combo of solar panels plus coconut oil-based generators for backup and battery charging.

Mydesign
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Re: Solar energy
Mydesign   11/27/2012 6:40:49 AM
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Ann, coconut oils is using for running the generator or some other purposes. Normally we used to have diesel generators, which are using at power cut time, as an alternate source of energy.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Solar energy
Ann R. Thryft   12/3/2012 3:07:23 PM
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Mydesign, thanks for the clarification. Sounds like "hybrid" means more or less the same thing being used in Tokelau.

Mydesign
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Re: Solar energy
Mydesign   12/4/2012 6:00:23 AM
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"Sounds like "hybrid" means more or less the same thing being used in Tokelau"

Ann, what way 'hybrid' is defined in Tokelau. Is it a combination of two technology.

tekochip
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ROI
tekochip   11/20/2012 8:14:59 AM
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The problem I've had with using solar for my lawn mower is that the storage batteries don't last very long.  In my application lead acid only lasts about three years.  I just repacked with NiMh, hoping to get a little more life, but the cost of NiMh is about 3X of SLA, so it's a hefty pricetag.  I realize that solar charging has nothing to do with the short life span of the batteries, but it does make me realize that all alternative energy sources need a better storage medium.  Even if a medium drain application had to repack the cells every five years, the cost would be excessive.

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