HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Guest Blogs

Petroski on Engineering: Envelopes of Experience

NO RATINGS
< Previous Page 2 / 2
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/3  >  >>
GlennA
User Rank
Gold
Re: I tried and i could not
GlennA   3/26/2012 8:48:40 AM
NO RATINGS
ervin0072002:  You seem very defensive.

Yes, I have had several hotshot young bosses - what upsets them most is when I show them up.  It is okay to disagree with your boss, UNLESS it turns out your boss is wrong, and you are right.  I have fixed machines that engineers and technicians with several years more education, several years more experience, and several years more seniority couldn't fix.  But now I am being immodest.

Sure, the world could survive without my skills.  Are you suggesting that the world could not survive without you ?  One day, many years from now, you will look back on this and wonder why it seemed so important at the time.

I have found that getting angry and tense doesn't help, so now I just try to find the humor in watching young hotshots flail and founder.  And if they do eventually ask for my help, I do try to help them.

ervin0072002
User Rank
Gold
Re: I tried and i could not
ervin0072002   3/25/2012 9:09:21 AM
NO RATINGS
Hello GlennA, Angry much? Fyi i know how to use a slide ruler, i am a collector of slide rulers too. I also know how to add even though i use a debit card. I have a degree in math as well. Also because i have a degree in math and my extensive knowledge in analysis and geometry i have a perfect understanding of 3D. I am also working on a masters in computer science. Now stop being cranky because the world can survive without your skills. And a friendly advice. When you get that hot shot young boss (you will at some point in your career) dont talk to him with this attitude.

GlennA
User Rank
Gold
Re: I tried and i could not
GlennA   3/23/2012 3:53:55 PM
NO RATINGS
I guess you are also glad you never had to learn how to use a slide rule - that was my first 'calculator', and the batteries never died at a critical time.  The operator had to know where to put the decimal point.  And the first electronic calculators (red LED's) were 'slide-rule calculators', before the time of digital calculators.

CAD helps a draughtsman draw better.  But if you don't know how to draw by hand, you can't draw in CAD.  I had CAD-CAM operators complain that they couldn't create a certain profile in CAD.  But they also couldn't explain what they were trying to do.  After sketching from their description, usually by the 3rd revision I had deciphered what they wanted to do.  Then I could explain the steps to re-create the profile in CAD.

But then I also feel sorry for the cashiers that have to rely on the cash register  to calculate change.  If they punch in too quickly and it says $0.18 change, they have no idea that the 7 cents I am offering is to make up to a quarter (25 cents).  (I expect you just use your debit card.)

The most important tool for any Engineer, is a brain that works.  That is what actually makes your tools, whichever are your favorites, useful.

ervin0072002
User Rank
Gold
Re: I tried and i could not
ervin0072002   3/23/2012 8:22:21 AM
NO RATINGS

3drob all I have to say to that comment is:

 

Spice Software,

 

Cad Software,

 

Microsoft Office,

 

is all an engineer needs. Drawing and drafting in college is generally last grasp to resist change from older engineers that feel cheated that they had to go through the pains of learning how to draw and the younger generation does not. Same thing happened with calculators and now and it's happening again with the internet.

 

3drob
User Rank
Platinum
Re: I tried and i could not
3drob   3/22/2012 9:22:16 AM
NO RATINGS
I took drafting in college.  I was never very good, but there are skills there that are necessary to have in your career, and I see it as a critical step to communicating.  I'm an EE, but I've often been responsible for the "whole box".  Being able to draw (even incompetently) allows you to better "see" things yourself, and communicate them across job boundaries.

Just as children must learn math BEFORE they start using calculators, Engineers should learn to draw and communicate effectively.  After all, Engineering is both creation and communication;  what's that if not ART?

Reminds me of a good Engineering book:  A Canticle for Leibowitz

ervin0072002
User Rank
Gold
I tried and i could not
ervin0072002   3/22/2012 9:00:32 AM
NO RATINGS

Both my parents are Electro mechanical tech's with Vocational high school degrees. Both of them are capable of drawing better than the paid drafters in our company. They tried and tried to teach me how to draw. It never clicked. I can draw stick people, my circles look like ellipses, and lets just say that I prefer hyperbolic geometry since I cannot draw straight lines. I am grateful that drafting is not required any more. That would have been a road block for me. I enjoy looking at the work but it's a dying art. Soon enough the only place to hold any hand drafted plans will be museums.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: saved by the computer
Charles Murray   3/20/2012 8:17:59 PM
I'm the same, ChasChas. I could draw a plan view or elevation reasonably well, but was incapable of doing an oblique view of even the simplest objects. After awhile, my employers understood this and tended to put me in front of a computer, where I could do less damage.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Petroski on Engineering: Envelopes of Experience
Charles Murray   3/20/2012 8:14:06 PM
NO RATINGS
Excellent point, vimulkumarp, and I'm glad somebody said it. I've read "To Engineer Is Human" twice and have quoted it on this website more than once. Professor Petroski has a rare quality among university professors these days -- he's a master of communication who can speak equally well to experts and to the man on the street.  

ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
saved by the computer
ChasChas   3/20/2012 5:29:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Unlike Chuck Siple, I cannot draw.

My mind makes great designs and pictures, but I cannot draw them - without a computer.

I was a hands on designer only - when the computer came out, I went back to school and got my mechanical engineering degree.

What a blessing the computer is for me!

GlennA
User Rank
Gold
Re: Petroski on Engineering: Envelopes of Experience
GlennA   3/20/2012 1:37:43 PM
NO RATINGS
CAD is a tool for a draughtsman.  If you don't know how to properly use CAD, the result is garbage, not a drawing.  One basic that is not understood is that a CAD drawing is drawn full size, but is scaled to fit the paper it will be printed on.  The first job that I had using AutoCAD Release 9 (I learned on Release 10), had drawings done by a hacker - every mistake that we had been taught to not do, was in that drawing.  I learned manual drafting, so I appreciate the accuracy and features of CAD.  One of the finer points of manual drafting was knowing how to do a true size projection.

Page 1/3  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Guest Blogs
As additive manufacturing (including 3D printing) becomes increasingly popular among businesses as a quick and easy solution to creating and evaluating prototypes and end-use products, the debate about whether to outsource production or to purchase equipment for in-house use is at the forefront of industry discussions.
With increasing terrorist threats overseas, organizations are thinking about how best to defend themselves here and abroad. Engineering can play a role, especially when it comes to putting a barrier between yourself and the bad guys.
Time to market is everything, but at the same time, you cant sacrifice quality for speed. Thats where additive manufacturing comes into play.
In the last few years, use of CFD in building design has increased manifolds. Computational fluid dynamics is effective in analyzing the flow and thermal properties of air within spaces. It can be used in buildings to find the best measures for comfortable temperature at low energy use.
Feature-advantage-benefit could help engineers in how we approach design problems, how we sell our ideas to management, and how we market ourselves when it comes to jobs.
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service