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Understanding Galvanic Corrosion

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Alexander Wolfe
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Re: Part of a core foundation
Alexander Wolfe   1/23/2012 10:26:09 PM
In EE, we had two semesters of chemistry in freshman year. (Never got a lot of use out of it or learned much.) We had no metallurgy at all, no materials science. I guess that was in the ME curriculum, but from reading Dave's excellent piece here, I can see that some exposure would've been beneficial. I guess everything eventually returns to its base form if exposed to the elements long enough.

Charles Murray
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Re: Part of a core foundation
Charles Murray   1/23/2012 7:39:55 PM
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Good point, Beth. When I studied engineering, we took two semesters of chemistry and one of material science (or metallurgy, which was more typical back then), but the chemistry of corrosion was never discussed, as I recall. Very nice article.

William K.
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Understanding galvanic corrosion.
William K.   1/23/2012 4:05:27 PM
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This is a simple and yet very informative write up. THANKS! It would have been useful for some of the engineers at Chrysler Corp to have been a bit more familiar with this a few years ago. The corrosive failure mode of extruded aluminum alloy bumpers is very impressive, in addition to being quite discouraging. Of course, sea water is not nearly as salty as the saturated brine solution found on our Southeast Michigan roadways every winter. So of course, just because cars might survive a dunk in the ocean idoes not mean that they would last very long here.

Probably it would be a good idea for all schools offering engineering courses to add a course in corrosion, and to put it at a senior level.  

evofxdwg
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Iron
Re: Part of a core foundation
evofxdwg   1/23/2012 11:41:22 AM
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Thanks for that reference Dave Palmer. I will definitely look into it.  I became interested in the subject several years ago when i installed a Ground Source Heat Pump in my home. I was interested in how to protect metallic pipe in the ground, or immersed in a well. Well water is mildly acidic in my area.  But im assuming pipe in the ground in contact with various types of sand/clay might be a different, more complex problem.  Metallic pipe, or an immersed metallic coil heat exchanger would be much better for heat transfer than the recommended formulation of poly pipe recommended by the Ground Source Heat Pump industry. (After looking at the problem a bit, i decided only titanium might be viable.  I did not install metallic pipe because i could not obtain a cheap source of surplus titanium tubing or coils, nor reliably solve the interconnection problem due to corrsion of clamps)

PS: WOW I just looked at that document - way more info than i found before. I will digest it at home thoroughly!

Dave Palmer
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Re: Part of a core foundation
Dave Palmer   1/23/2012 11:26:58 AM
@evofxdwg: Yes, it's definitely possible to prevent corrosion using impressed DC current. This is done mainly for large structures; it tends not to be practical in smaller applications. Of course, this works the other way around, too: stray currents in the water can accelerate corrosion of outboard engines, for instance. A good source of information on designing cathodic protection systems for structures is U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Technical Manual 5-811-7, which can be found online.

vimalkumarp
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Gold
galvanic corrosion
vimalkumarp   1/23/2012 10:23:16 AM
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Thanks a lot for this great article on understandind galvanic corrosion. This is a very important topic in the ever increasing "mechatronics" design and development enviornment. These types of articles are worth their value in gold. This is a must read article.

evofxdwg
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Iron
Re: Part of a core foundation
evofxdwg   1/23/2012 9:27:02 AM
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Interesting article. I would also like to see a basic tutorial of how to prevent galvanic corrosion actively with electric current. What are the rules of thumb for current flow or voltage, magnitude/polarity, critical control parameters, reliable connection, etc?  I know such devices exist but not much about them. This information might be useful for protection of metallic pipes in the ground, marine fixed and floating structures, expensive industrial and residential plumbing systems, and any metal structure with dissimilar metals and/or ground/electrolyte contact.  Would this method be any better than the common "sacrificial anode" method in saltwater?

mrmikel
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Iron
Re: Part of a core foundation
mrmikel   1/23/2012 9:17:55 AM
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Seems like a subject that ought to covered in more depth.  Easy for a bridge designer for instance to build a time bomb into a bridge without intending to.  Important for field engineers to make clear to maintainers why certain hardware is used to eliminate entirely avoidable failures.  Really glad he brought the subject up.

Alexander Wolfe
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Welcome, Dave
Alexander Wolfe   1/22/2012 10:03:55 AM
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Welcome, Dave, as Design News' newest guest blogger. For readers who enjoyed this -- as did I -- we'll have another blog from Dave in a few weeks. As you can tell, he's a serious materials expert.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Part of a core foundation
Rob Spiegel   1/20/2012 3:31:27 PM
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Good article -- and surprising, Dave. The chemistry here is counter intuitive. there are some things that take knowledge, not just instinct.

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