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Gadget Freak Case #228: Super LED Flashlight Hits 3,000 Lumens
10/19/2012

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RudySchneider
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Iron
Re: Go John!
RudySchneider   10/22/2012 2:04:43 PM
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@Dave ---

I don't mean to argue, but I think you need to re-think that.  If I place two 1K, 1-Watt resistors in series, I end up with a 2K, 1-watt resistor.  The same holds true for three series 1/3-ohm, 30-watt resistors, as in John's example.  It ends up being a 1-ohm, 30-watt resistor. 

If John had started with nine 9-ohm, 10-watt resistors, and placed them ALL in parallel, I agree that he would end up with a 1-ohm, 90-watt resistor.  That's not what he describes, however.

Eddy Current
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Iron
Re: Go John!
Eddy Current   10/22/2012 1:06:47 PM
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From your video we can see that you have done some experimentation with other batteries and LEDs.  Enjoyable video and it looks like you are having fun. 

What's next for you?

-Eddy

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Go John!
mrdon   10/22/2012 12:55:20 PM
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Hi John,

To aid in your LED lighting research experiments, here's a cool online circuit simulation website called Circuit Lab. Nice way to do paper analysis first and then model it using software. Here's the link below. Enjoy!!!

https://www.circuitlab.com/

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Go John!
mrdon   10/22/2012 12:39:20 PM
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Hi John,

I shared your Gadget Freak video with a group of  DC-AC Electronics students at ITT Tech to get them motivated about Electrical-Electronics Engineering Tech. I wanted to illustrate the importance of doing homework, which you elegantly demonstrated, in the video based on your LED research. Keep the good work!!! 

dbell5
User Rank
Gold
Re: Go John!
dbell5   10/22/2012 12:16:11 PM
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Great job, John! Keep up the good work.

 

Rudy Schneider:

Huh?!?  Better go back and study Ohm's Law again, my friend!

Paralleling three equal 10W resistors will, as you agreed give you a 30W equivalent.

Placing three equal 30W resistors *however achieved* in series will indeed give you a 90W equivalent. If all nine resistors are of the same value, the combination will have the equivalent resistance of a single resistor, with nine times the power rating.

 

Dave

RudySchneider
User Rank
Iron
Re: Go John!
RudySchneider   10/22/2012 11:50:24 AM
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Just a quick correction, John...

You are correct that three 10-watt resistors in parallel will make a 30-watt resistor that is one-third the resistance.  But then adding three of these 30-watt resistors in series will only result in a resistor of the original value, but STILL only capable of dissipating 30 Watts, not 90W as you stated.

Fklein23
User Rank
Iron
Re: Go John!
Fklein23   10/22/2012 10:09:48 AM
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John: I am impressed with your results and would like to talk to you about your future. My name is Frank Rudolph and you can reach me on Linked-In under that name. You can reach me on Linked-In or directly at docrudolph@gmail.com, or at rudolph@beaconpower.com. At Beacon Power, our corporate charter focuses on alternative energy and sustainability.

Incidentally, if you don't already have a Linked-In account, you should get one now!! Judging from what I have read here, you have a brilliant career ahead of you, and making contacts with a network of people in the industry should start for you right now! Good job! Keep on thinking of new stuff.

 

laserdudephil
User Rank
Iron
Nice work John
laserdudephil   10/22/2012 9:36:09 AM
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You're clearly well on your way to an elustrious career in electrical engineering.  Do take a look at the ol' LM317 (LM117,217,317) voltage regulator datasheet.  Somewhere in the back is a constant current regulator circuit that you will find very useful in your line of research.  Also, check out Natsemi's (now TI) boost switching regulators.  Just add an inductor, a FET, a diode and a bunch of caps to nake a voltage step-up constant current regulator.  I just finished a controller design to drive those ebay 100W modules (33V @ 3A) off of 12V power.  Keep having fun.

-Phil

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: done
Beth Stackpole   10/22/2012 7:01:45 AM
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John: Nearly as impressive as your design is your knowledge of the different specifications and attention to using that data as part of a process around design tradeoffs. Looking under the covers and considering the pros and cons of different materials and different design choices is all part of the game and you are well on your way to becoming quite a diligent and thoughtful engineer.

John Duffy
User Rank
Gold
Re: done
John Duffy   10/21/2012 12:30:40 AM
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Not sure whether you meant that those are better, or this is, but I did notice that they were over $600 and $1000usd respectively.  This was about $50, and runs cold.  Those, just judging by size, would run VERY hot, and would probably not run for the claimed ~2 hours without overheating.  Either way, I wasn't claiming that this is the brightest possible light, just that it is very bright.   

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