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Gadget Freak Case #228: Super LED Flashlight Hits 3,000 Lumens
10/19/2012

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John Duffy's super LED flashlight is almost three times as powerful as xenon car headlights.
John Duffy's super LED flashlight is almost three times as powerful as xenon car headlights.

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William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Super 3000 lumen flashlight
William K.   10/29/2012 6:53:52 PM
In response to the nasty criticism about this being so very dangerous. Most of the readers drive cars, which are far more dangerous than this flashlight. Almost everything requires a bit of wisdom and good judgement to use. The safety rules designed to protect drunks bent on self destruction are a needless burden on most of society. What I am referencing is the european safety regulations for electrical equipment, by the way. 

At some point an individual must take responsibility for the results of their actions, and a big part of that responsibility is understanding what one is doing. I know that is offensive to those who abhor personal responsibility, go ahead and be offended.

Those who produce my designs are confident in my level of responsibility, and know that I will not deliver a design that will not meet the project requirements. That would be a big risk if I were not responsible enough to assure that the design was adequate. Certainly there are many other engineers in a similar position, who are responsible for doing their job correctly. Those are the good engineers, the others need to have fifty people check their work for errors, oversights, and other types of goof-ups.

armorris
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Nice work John
armorris   10/25/2012 5:17:22 PM
NO RATINGS
I disagree with the statement that Gadget Freak articles are just for novices. I'm a retired electrical engineer and I don't miss a single one. Even an experienced engineer can sometimes learn something.

John Duffy
User Rank
Gold
Re: Nice work John
John Duffy   10/24/2012 2:55:30 PM
NO RATINGS
For the most part, it is eye-safe.  I wear sunglasses for the final test, and welding goggles while building becasue I am right next to the lights.  More than a foot or so away, and it's not very dangerous for a short glance.  Only when you are RIGHT on the LEDs does it really start to cause damage (I used a light-sensitive resistor and the threshold of a 3mW laser to determine what would cause eye damage). 

 

Basically, if you don't have something right in front of the LEDs, and no one is looking directly at it, it isn't dangerous. 

 

 

askeng
User Rank
Iron
Re: Nice work John
askeng   10/24/2012 10:27:32 AM
NO RATINGS
First off let me give John a thumbs up for the good work.

 I have been reading this article over and over and cannot understand how Design News publishes a project that falls into a category of a flash light that can cause eye damage if looked at accidentally.  This is not a novice project and Design News should considered not publishing projects of this type.

Sorry for the negative comment, but really.

John Duffy
User Rank
Gold
Re: Go John!
John Duffy   10/23/2012 7:51:36 PM
NO RATINGS
Good idea with the switching regultor, though I may just post that as an instructable or something, not pass it off as a full gadget freak. 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Go John!
Charles Murray   10/23/2012 7:25:29 PM
NO RATINGS
Congratulations again, John. You've got the makings of a great product here. For those who haven't seen John's earlier work in Gadget Freak, look here:

http://www.designnews.com/message.asp?piddl_fieldsmode=new&piddl_replymsgid=820478&piddl_msgtopicid=68&piddl_msgthreadid=257349

MYRONB
User Rank
Gold
Re: Go John!
MYRONB   10/23/2012 7:04:11 PM
NO RATINGS
Nice project;it's great to see this lad working hands-on on this project. Perhaps a good follow-on project would be to design a switching regulator and avoid the power loss in the resistor bank. Keep up the the good work you've started. Best regards, Myron Boyajian

John Duffy
User Rank
Gold
Re: Go John!
John Duffy   10/22/2012 11:30:50 PM
NO RATINGS
No need to apoligize.  It's not really a big deal.  Either way, it gave me an exceuse to stop doing homework every couple of minutes. 

RudySchneider
User Rank
Iron
Re: Go John!
RudySchneider   10/22/2012 9:29:25 PM
NO RATINGS
Dave, John, et al ---

My humble apologies.  I just cranked through the numbers (Using E^2/R, 90W across 1-ohm means voltage of ~9.48V, and current of ~9.48V; break that into thirds, carry the zero, hold yer tongue right, etc...) and John (along with the rest of you) is correct!  Somehow, 30 years as a BSEE and all, I let my mind take over before doing the (full) analysis.

Leigh
User Rank
Silver
Re: Go John!
Leigh   10/22/2012 6:57:59 PM
NO RATINGS
@Rudy. DBell5 is correct.

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