HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
REGISTER   |   LOGIN   |   HELP
Blogs
Gadget Freak

Gadget Freak Case #251: Billiards Ball Counter

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
armorris
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Small Details Matter.
armorris   2/26/2014 12:33:28 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks a lot. I've enjoyed your stuff, too.

wgrill
User Rank
Iron
Re: Small Details Matter.
wgrill   2/26/2014 12:25:34 PM
NO RATINGS
I've read and enjoyed your stuff... and it is good stiff.

armorris
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Small Details Matter.
armorris   2/26/2014 12:17:58 PM
NO RATINGS

The page I'm on is that the project needs to be reproducible by others with the necessary skills. I have 7 Gadget Freak projects and one magazine article. It irks me when I see a project that uses some kind of embedded code with little or no comments describing how the code works. Besides creating gadgets and projects myself, I like to learn from other peoples' projects, like yours. If your code was commented, I might learn something from it. I want people to learn from my code, or be able to rewrite it to run in whatever processor the builder is most comfortable with. Just because few other gadget makers adequately comment their code is no reason for me not to.

wgrill
User Rank
Iron
Re: Small Details Matter.
wgrill   2/25/2014 12:07:49 PM
NO RATINGS
This was my 50th article and 17th published gadget. I believe we are on different pages when considering what detail and what value is provided in a submittal such as this one. Consider some of the other articles both I have and others have submitted and published, I don't feel an amateur label.   

No offense taken and I hope none received..

  

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Small Details Matter.
William K.   2/24/2014 6:07:06 PM
NO RATINGS
D_A, really it is better to have the reset function use two buttons since that is a good way to prevent an accidental rest, which I have done with other equipment on a few occasions. So I would vote that the two button reset is a good choice.

I would also offer that the box did not need a PIC processor to deliver that functionality. The CD4510 is a handy up/down counter that needs no programming, and just by examining the circuit diagram the function is quite obvious. Plus it is a chip that will be around for a few more years, unlike the cute little micro chips that become obsolete a year after release, and are mostly single sourced. One can be hurt quite badly by using single sourced parts, I know first hand about that.

armorris
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Small Details Matter.
armorris   2/24/2014 11:14:56 AM
NO RATINGS
I guess if you don't play billiards, you don't know what the gadget does. The ASM code has almost no comments in it, making it extremely difficult for someone else to figure out what the code is doing.

You'll notice in my GF projects that when I use a PIC microcontroller, the ASM code is heavily commented. Without the comments, even I would forget how the code works after a year or two.

Other than that, I think it's a nice project. I certainly appreciate the engineering talent that went into making it. Just please comment your code, so that the rest of us can learn from it.

far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: Small Details Matter.
far911   2/23/2014 1:50:00 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree paying attention to minor details for future improvement is necessary.

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Small Details Matter.
mrdon   2/23/2014 1:30:59 PM
NO RATINGS
Daniyal_Ali

 

I understand your points about getting  into the practice of insuring the small details are captured during a rapid prototyping phase. I stress this with both my adult and high school students I teaach in electrical/electronics and robotics technology. My books have the same philosophy as well. Therefore, you and I are definitely on the same page. Just curious, what type of products are you currently developing?

http://www.amazon.com/Make-Projects-Experiments-Microcontrollers-Electronics/dp/1449360661/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1393180097&sr=8-1&keywords=don+wilcher

http://www.amazon.com/Learn-Electronics-Arduino-Technology-Action/dp/1430242663/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1393180173&sr=8-3&keywords=don+wilcher

Daniyal_Ali
User Rank
Iron
Re: Small Details Matter.
Daniyal_Ali   2/23/2014 4:06:19 AM
NO RATINGS

I agree mrdon. It is indeed a good prototype and i am not taking any credit away from him. I was just trying to guide him for his future endeavors so that his next prototypes are even better for him and for the rest of us. Even the great inventors in today's fast developing world sometimes ignore the small details which can make the difference between them and their competitors. If we get into the habit of paying attention to our small and rapid prototypes early in our lives, we can create beautiful products as we move forward.

          "The difference between ordinary and extra-ordinary is that little extra"
                                                                                          -Jimmy Johnson

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Detail Circuit Schematic Diagram
mrdon   2/22/2014 8:47:48 PM
NO RATINGS
William

In reviewing the build document, I was wondering if you have a detail circuit schematic diagram showing the 4 digit 7 Segment LED display with actual pin numbers on it. I understand the display used is based on the hobbyists preference but showing your example as wiring template will help others to build their gadget successfully.

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Gadget Freak
Eric Chesak created a sensor that can detect clouds, and it can also measure different sources of radiation.
This Gadget Freak Review looks at an affordable plug-and-play printer, a 3D printer that was hacked by a group of French design students to create real tattoos, and an analog camera that was built using 3D-printed and laser-cut parts.
What youíll find in this Technology Roundup is the best of the best Gadget Freak projects, as voted on by you -- our loyal readers.
We look at a wearable device that uses an adhesive electrode and headband to help reduce migraines, as well as a plug-and-play outlet cover that replaces traditional night lights.
Al Linke's animated weather display uses a Rasberry Pi to periodically pull weather conditions from the Internet and then displays a corresponding animation on an LED display.
Design News Webinar Series
3/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
2/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
12/18/2013 Available On Demand
11/20/2013 Available On Demand
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 21 - 25, Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: April 29 - Day 1
Sponsored by maxon precision motors
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service